Reflections on Diana Documentary: Can a Historical Figure Have Personal Space?

The heated discussion about the new documentary Diana: In Her Own Words made my phone go mad with notifications, as I had subscribed to all Diana-related news. I had heard some of Princess Diana’s tapes previously on YouTube as they had been broadcast by the American television long before, and could not understand at first, why make all this fuss about them being shown in the UK. Now I am even doubting whether I was right to hear any of those recordings, even if they were posted for public. The thing is – I am thinking hard whether a person of historical importance should be deprived of privacy even after her death?

Diana was haunted by the media throughout her life. It is reasonable to suppose that the huge public interest in her gave the newspapers enormous profits. Does public interest equal people’s love? Every single detail of her personal life was hungrily read both by fans and haters. It was an obsession. Now that she is dead, I am convinced that haters and obsessed followers should step back and quietly respect her for what she was. Keep her memory alive, the best memories of her, and not make a sensation out of what she would not like it to be made of.

This is not just for her children’s sake. It is also for Diana’s sake. For her name’s sake. And you will never convince me that her life belongs to history and everybody has rights to know it. Do the tiniest details of her personal life matter to the history? Have they changed its course? No. We all know that she experienced difficulties in her marriage which ended in a divorce. Why do you want to hear more of it? I just do not see why it is so important.

If we truly love Diana, her will must guide us in everything we do about her memory. Would she appreciate excessive publications of her private affairs? Hardly. She always wanted to be remembered for the work she did. So why we do not make more films about her charity patronages, landmine campaigns, the famous auction where she sold most of her marvelous dresses?

She was a woman with a complicated personal life, yes. But she was more than that. Let us put an emphasis on that MORE. If we do, it will turn out that she has enough of her personal space. As any other historical figure should have. Let us respect it!

Cathy

Why a WordPress Like Means Much More than a Facebook Like

Inspired by Why I won’t follow you back! by Naya on My life book, and Follow by Jeff Cann on The Other Stuff, I decided to explore the significance of WordPress likes rather than follows (since it has been done thoroughly by my fellow bloggers) and compare to those on Facebook.

First of all, let us see what you invest in one blog post versus fb profile pic (probably the most “liked” item on your timeline). Your article equals brainstorming + editing + formatting + wish to appeal to the audiences + courage to share your passions and opinions. A profile pic requires maximum some hysteria about a dozen unsuccessful selfies and a mini heart attack because of low battery on your phone. As you see, writing on WordPress is much more challenging and the appreciation of your efforts then costs infinitely more.

Now let us answer the question who are your “likers”. On Facebook, those are (mostly) people you know in person, somebody who will hit a “like” just because they know you, and not because your latest photo is really as ravishing as Angelina Jolie’s. A Facebook “like” is (most often) either the fulfillment of an unwritten rule of friendship (you are my friend = you like my profile pic), or a way to attract your attention and flatter you a bit. On WordPress, you hardly know anyone – we are here from all around the world, many of us even do not reveal our faces or tell everything about our personal problems. We are here to express ourselves. Thus, a WordPress “like” means that the way of our self-expression is valued, our ideas are appealing to someone, our brain content is worth being published because is appreciated by another creative, thinking individual.

Hence, when I press a “like” on your post, you may be sure that I really-really mean it. I am very proud of having a sidebar called “Posts I Like” – and yours appear there as soon as you trigger my thoughts or move my feelings. I am extremely happy to see the orange dot by the notifications bell and discover that some of my efforts have appealed to you, too. Tiny red squares on Facebook never affect me the same way.

On Facebook, you are who appear to be. On WordPress, you are what you think.

Cathy