Pride and Prejudice and Disney

A few days ago I came across this hilarious pic on Pinterest

d2c967bf049a41dfb2ea3869c7acb52d--pride-and-prejudice-memes-ballet-performances

…and it inspired me to search for five more similarities between Pride and Prejudice characters and those of Disney. Let’s start!

Lizzy: She loves to read. She is headstrong and brave. She is prejudiced against her future husband. She has dark hair in both 1995 and 2005 film adaptions. She is…

012615_BeautyandtheBeast_Belle.jpg
Belle (from Nerdist)

Darcy: He is (seemingly) selfish. A terrible introvert. Does not want to admit his feelings. Undergoes a curing transformation and turns out to be quite tolerable. He is…

characters_beautyandthebeast_beast_36c202f3.jpeg
The Beast (from Disney Movies). And do not get me wrong, I do not mean the looks 🙂

Jane: She is famous for her beauty. She is kind and naive. She believes in true love faithfully. She is definitely

PrincessAuroraSleeps
Princess Aurora (from  Disney Wiki). Remember Jane lying ill in 1995 film adaption and you will understand where the association has come from.

Bingley: A very simple minded, naive, cute, friendly guy. Never looks deep into the problem, expresses his feelings ridiculously openly. Although he is never portrayed to be dark-haired, I am still convinced he is a total

kpwjxuw3gewwewb4y2pd
Prince Eric (from Movie Pilot)

Charlotte Lucas: I would have never mentioned her if I did not have a strong association of this nice, modest girl with

Min448974LARGE.jpg

I am aware that I haven’t satisfied your curiosity about such significant characters as Mr. and Mrs. Bennet, Mr. Wickham, Kitty, Lydia and many-many others (oh, the irresistible Mr. Collins, too, of course!). I will definitely try to work on this in the future, but I also hope for your imagination! Let me know your thoughts here in the comments so that we can make a new Pride and Prejudice adaption featuring Disney characters!

Cathy

Advertisements

On My Favourite Books and Mr. Darcy

Read Pride and Prejudice. Now I’ve got my third favourite novel along with Wuthering Heights and The Thorn Birds. I cannot decide which one of them I prefer over the other.

Pride and Prejudice – my ideal romance and marriage mixed with charming humour.

Wuthering Heights – violent, crazy love of heroes raised out of hell, surrounded by wild nature and some Gothic motives of magical influence.

The Thorn Birds – contradiction of need and moral principles, duty and affection, religion and love.

I shall never forget that my perfect man is Mr. Darcy, as he has always been. But I want him sometimes to forget his high position at least for an instant and run away with me to the moors. So, a slight influence of Heathcliff would do no harm. But he can still be who he really is – just Mr. Darcy. I shall still love him more than anybody else.

7aaabf765d1908139442759cdc5e6292

Cathy

Image taken from:

Pinterest

Why You Should Not Eat Chocolate Cakes While Reading “Pride and Prejudice”

I was so eager to make an argumentative essay out of this, but I doubt whether my ambitions are commensurable with the content. Whatever the form of this text is, I urge you to read it – it will help you avoid tons of problems, while the experience of reading Jane Austen’s masterpiece will not become less delicious if you just put a couple of plates aside.

download

There is a single reason for not trying to make the process of getting acquainted with an English literary classic twice as paradise-like: every plot twist will serve you for an excuse to sweeten the anxiety you will fell for the protagonists, or to celebrate the fortunate state of affairs. Imagine:

Mr. Bingley comes to Netherfield. No matter how silly Mrs. Bennet might seem to you, you cannot help rejoicing with her, because Mr. Bingley’s arrival is an inevitable start of some kind of a love story. A piece of cake to this.

Mr. Darcy refuses to dance with Lizzy. You know that Lizzy is watched by dozens of people and cannot cover her distress with a thick layer of chocolate cream. So you do it yourself.

Mr. Collins. Just everything about this fellow puts you under suspense, starting from his wish to marry Lizzy to his actual proposal which is hardly to be born. Your plate is empty and you go for another. You applaud Lizzy’s refusal by drinking some hot chocolate in addition.

Mr. Bingley leaves for London. The initial celebration of a possible good match proves to be an illusion. Hopes are shattered. You are almost in tears. Something sweet is the only escape.

Lizzy refuses Mr. Darcy. How about ordering a pizza? You have eaten lots of chocolate, but who cares now? There is such a collapse of everything!

And so it goes until the very end. Meanwhile, Mr. Wickham manages to damage not only your diet, but also your nerves (along with those of Mrs. Bennet). The final resolution of all pains results in a huge wedding party you organize for the protagonists – and get all the meal as the only guest.

So, my advice is – read Pride and Prejudice as far from the refrigerator as possible. Not that I am afraid for your willpower. It’s just that sometimes we sympathize with fictional characters that this sympathy might result in stress – and food, especially chocolate, and especially cakes, and maybe some pizza for dessert is the best cure for our all-consuming emotions.

Cathy

Image taken from wikiHow

© 2017 Cathy Sanju, My English Paradise. All rights reserved.